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Featured Courses

Below are the upper division courses on offer by the Department of History for the fall 2016 semester. You can find more detailed information (such as location and course syllabi) on the current Department of History class schedule. To register for History courses, login to CIS.
 

(HIST 3320) Incas and Ancestors

This course focuses on the civilizations of the ancient Andes. Beginning with an overview of the earliest settlements on the Peruvian coast, this class traces the development of the earliest societies in the Andes paying special attention to major transitions such as the maritime foundations of Andean civilization, the advent and spread of agriculture in the Andes, the construction and use of monumental architecture, the formation of states, and the implimentation of imperalism. Taught by Professor Bradley Parker.

 

 

(HIST 3350) The History of Brazil: 1500 to Now

From sun, surf, and sex, to cybercrime, and from the 2014 World Cup to the 2016 Olympics, Brazil never fails to capture the global imagination. This course explores the transformation of Brazil from a colonial backwater into one of the modern world’s largest and most diverse nations. Through film, music, and an array of other material, students examine issues including religion and cross-cultural interaction, race and slavery, industrialization and urban growth, the environment, and the pursuit of political and economic stability. Taught by Professor Hugh Cagle.

 

(HIST 3520) Premodern Japan

The objective of this class is to introduce students to the historical development of early Japan through lectures, visual presentations and discussion of readings by Japanese authors in translation. The course surveys pre-modern Japan from its early kingdoms to the close of the Tokugawa era in the 19th century. It examines both social and political aspects of this history, highlighting the political and institutional contexts of classical court culture, the rise and decline of the warrior class, and the process of urbanization and changes it brought to the merchant and peasant classes. Taught by Professor Wes Sasaki-Uemura.

 

(HIST 3530) Modern Japan

The objective of this class is to introduce students to the historical development of early Japan through lectures, visual presentations and discussion of readings by Japanese authors in translation. The course surveys pre-modern Japan from its early kingdoms to the close of the Tokugawa era in the 19th century. It examines both social and political aspects of this history, highlighting the political and institutional contexts of classical court culture, the rise and decline of the warrior class, and the process of urbanization and changes it brought to the merchant and peasant classes. Taught by Professor Wes Sasaki-Uemura.

 

(HIST 4200) Special Topics: Comparative Empires

Empires are among the oldest state constructs in the world and appeared on all continents except Australia. The main objective of this course is to develop a complex understanding of power politics and  economic motive. The two are often cited as the main driving forces in the historical process. But even during the so-called early modern period when the European overseas expansion occurred, the seemingly dominant forces of power and commerce were enmeshed in a dense web of religion, tradition, and law. This web cannot be reduced to our contemporary secular ideology of competitive struggles for control and profit. Taught by Professor Peter Von Sivers.

 

(HIST 4360) Careers in Public History

Public history encompasses the diverse ways that history is put to work in the world outside the classroom. It is collaborative, engaged, and applied. Public historians work as museum professionals, consultants, archivists, cultural resource managers, government historians, and documentary filmmakers. They use a wide range of interdisciplinary and alternative methods (oral history, material culture, folklore, photographic analysis, digital exhibits) to engage broad public audiences. This course will introduce you to the essential methods of public history through applied assignments and hands-on experience. Taught by Professor Gregory E. Smoak.

 

(HIST 4510) Asian in the World (Japan's Aging Society)

In 1900, Japan was a young industrializing country. Life expectancy was 43-44 years for men and women respectively and one-third of the population was under age 15. In the first decade of the 21st century, life expectancy had doubled with 20% of the population over age 65, making Japan the “oldest” society in the world. This dramatic demographic shift has major economic, social and political implications as Japan tries to cope with its “graying” society. This course examines historical factors in this shift, focusing on post-World War II changes, and draws comparisons with patterns in Western and other Asian nations. Prior knowledge of Japanese history is not required. Taught by Professor Wes Sasaki-Uemura.

 

(HIST 4525) Asian Film in Historical Context

This course explores Asian history and culture in India, China, Korea, Japan through films related to social issues. The films’ themes range from legacies of colonialism and the trauma of modernity to environmentalism and changing women’s roles and family dynamics. Genres range from documentaries to anime with both classic and avant-garde films and directors. Films will be accompanied by lectures and discussions of associated readings. A major objective is to gain an appreciation of social problems within various Asian countries and how their peoples attempt to solve them. Prior coursework in Asian history is not required.  Taught by Professor Wes Sasaki-Uemura. 

 

(HIST 4560) Asian American History

An overview of Asian American history from mid-19th century to the present. It describes the conditions and circumstances accounting for the Asian American presence, and analyzes major factors in their societal position. A key premise is that Asian Americans, as with other minority groups, are essential to shaping mainstream culture. In addition to the issue of race, the course highlights themes of labor, class and gender and their intersections in the on-going history of Asian Americans. It also incorporates our American West locale and encourages students to utilize their own knowledge of local communities and make use of local resource centers. Taught by Professor Wes Sasaki-Uemura. 

Last Updated: 3/14/17